Cotton Lint and Seed Facts


  01/09/13 3:35:23 PM

Statistics source: Georgia Agricultural Statistics Service (USDA) as of 8/26/11

2011 Cotton Crop Statistics  


- In 2011, cotton retained its position as one of the leading cash row crops in Georgia with production of 2.5 million bales of cotton lint at an estimated market value of $1.2 billion.  The cottonseed yield was 756 tons valued at approximately $161.3 million.  The market value of lint and seed was $1.3 billion!

- Georgia's cotton industry (including farms, gins, merchants, warehouses, cottonseed, cooperatives and textile mills) is responsible for providing innumerable jobs for Georgians.

- In 2011, Georgia ranked second nationally in cotton acreage with 1.6 million planted, and second in production with an average yield of 791 pounds of cotton per acre.  
   
- Sometimes called "white gold," cotton is the most widely grown row crop in Georgia.

- The highest number of cotton acres planted in Georgia (since accurate records were kept) occurred in 1914, with 5.15 million acres.

- The cotton gin was invented by Eli Whitney in 1793 while he was visiting a Georgia plantation. Its comb-like mechanism replaced the labor of 50 workers.

- The "Cotton States and International Exposition of 1895," was advertised as the grandest fair ever held in the "New South," and was held in Piedmont Park, Atlanta, Georgia. It showcased the economic recovery of the South in which cotton played a large role. It served as a way to highlight the region's natural resources and lure northern investors. Atlanta observed the centennial of the Exposition in 1995 with exhibits, lectures and special events.

- Cotton was first planted in the Trustees Garden, Savannah, Georgia in 1733. The seed came from England and though cotton was grown in other colonies, Florida and Virginia, Georgia was the first to produce it commercially. (The Trustees Garden was the "experiment station" of the day.)

- The first cotton mill in Georgia, the Bolton Factory, was built in 1811, near Washington, Georgia.

- In Georgia the the Boll Weevil Eradication Program was implemented in 1987 and by 1994, the boll weevil was declared an insignificant pest. There have been no weevils found in this state since 2002, which reduced production costs, provided improved conditions for an increased yield of cotton per acre and makes cotton production more environmentally friendly.  There is still a vigilant maintenance program in place to guard against the return of the boll weevil.

- When raw cottonseed is moved from the gin to a cottonseed oil mill, it consists of three parts: (1) LINTERS, the short, fuzzy fibers still clinging to the seed; (2) HULLS, a tough, protective coating on the seed kernel; and (3) the protein and oil-rich KERNEL itself.

- Linters are one of the finest sources for cellulose which is used to produce a number of things like plastic, rocket propellants, rayon, pharmaceutical emulsions, cosmetics, photography and x-ray film, upholstery, fine writing paper and even paper currency.

- Hulls are used mostly in the feed industry as a source of roughage for livestock.
Kernels are flaked and crushed to produce cottonseed oil and meal.  1 ton of cottonseed, crushed, can yield approximately 320 pounds of oil.  The meal and hulls are used in animal feeds as high protein and roughage supplements.

- Cottonseed imparts virtually no taste into foods cooked in it.  It is so versatile that it's also used in salad dressings, stir-fry and baking applications. It is regarded by the food industry as premium oil and is eagerly sought by prepared food makers.  The US snack food industry uses about 40% of the cottonseed oil produced in this country.

- Cottonseed oil is cholesterol free and contains a high level of antioxidents.  These are properties which inhibit foods from becoming rancid, giving them a longer shelf life.




Items that can be made from a bale of cotton
Womens' Items:
 
Handkerchiefs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21,960
Dresses. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 274
Brassieres. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6,460
Knit briefs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6,436
Jeans. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 249
Skirts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 409
Mid-calf socks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4,321
Woven blouses. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 773
Sweaters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 379
Nightgowns. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 780
Woven slacks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 415
Shorts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 733
   
Mens' Items:  
Handkerchiefs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8,347
Woven dress shirts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 765
Woven sport shirts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 906
Work shirts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 543
Boxers shorts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2,104
Knit briefs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2,419
Sleeveless undershirts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,943
Dress and sport trousers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 484
Work trousers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 374
Work gloves. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,918
Mid-calf socks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3,557
Jeans. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 215
T-shirts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,217
   
Miscellaneous Items:  
Cloth Diapers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3,085
Sheets. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 249
Pillow cases. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,256
Terry bath towels. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 690



How much cotton does it take? You might be surprized!

1 pair of jeans...................................... 24 ounces or 1.5 pounds
1 man's shirt.......................................... 10 ounces or .6 pounds
1 T-shirt................................................... 8 ounces or .5 pounds
1 bath towel........................................... 10 ounces or .6 pounds
1 cloth diaper....................................... 2.5 ounces or .15 pounds
 
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